AyeGear vs Scottevest

If you can't beat them, try to be them.

Worried about competition?  Look no further to Scottevest's 3-step-process which will help you gain an edge over your competitor:

1) Find out where your competitor is manufacturing their goods;

2) Register their brand name in that country;

3) Threaten competitor with legal action.


Email from the CEO:

It appears Scottevests' own employees aren't too happy with his behaviour either.

And lastly:

Rebuttal

In response to the accusations made by SCOTTEVEST, we’d like to clear the air - as there’s always two sides to a coin, right?

 

  1. We didn’t blatantly copy the clothing system of SCOTTEVEST. We use none of their trademarks or their wiring patent or any one else’s intellectual property for that matter. Furthermore, not that we use their patent, SCOTTEVEST has no valid patent for their wiring in the United Kingdom, despite it’s continuous threats.

  2. The video posted by Documentally - let’s just say that he’s a close friend of Mr Jordon (CEO of SCOTTEVEST) and has even helped SCOTTEVEST commercially. So let’s just leave it at that.

    Scott Jordan CEO of SCOTTEVEST
  3. I’m afraid purchasing something from company A does not equate to being 'knocked-off'. By this very definition, Scott Jordan has purchased various garments before they started their company (as written in his book) and has also recently backed (see below) the recent 'Worlds Best Travel Jacket' aka BauBax project on Kickstarter, does this mean he will knock it off? More laughably, Mr Jordan purchased garments from us - is it equally fair to say he purchased these to knock us off?

    Irony:

    Arrogant CEO
  4. On the day AyeGear was launched, the first person to write to us using our online 'contact us' form was... wait for it... Scott Jordan (the CEO and founder of Scottevest #PunIntended).

    CEO of Scottevest - Scott Jordan

    So, just by looking at our website, Mr Jordan was able to establish we were infringing on his designs and trademarks?

  5.  “Moreover, we have used the phrase (and variations thereof) "Take Everything, Everywhere" in a variety publications for several years.” insanity at it’s finest.

  6.  SCOTTEVEST claims the J22 was also a ‘direct copy’ of its products. This is false. As well as not using their protected trademark and design rights, our fabrics, designs, styling and sizing were not only superior but different to their claims. Not only was his claims of our products incorrect but unethical acts were carried out by employees in his firm, e.g. the marketing manager at SCOTTEVEST decided to post derogatory statements about AyeGear on our Facebook page - which in itself violates Section 4 of the Federal Trade Commission Act.

  7. SCOTTEVEST demanded an agreement from us which would require AyeGear to make certain admissions and acknowledgements that were factually incorrect. More egregiously, SCOTTEVEST required AyeGear to refrain in selling ANY products in the United States. Needless to say, the agreement was binned.

  8. Scott Jordon’s statements of Mark Cuban supporting our legal fees is incorrect, and hence why he is unable to provide any evidence of it.

    Scott Jordan VS Mark Cuban Shark Tank Clothing Scottevest

  9. Here are the ways in which AyeGear differentiates itself to that of SCOTTEVEST products:

      1. No internal wire management system - we believe implementing this is not worth the time and effort, especially given the move to Digital. The move to wireless is here and it’s here to stay. Sorry Scott.
      2. External design 
      3. Internal design
      4. Superior fabrics
      5. Superior workmanship
      6. Generous pocket sizing
      7. External pocket arrangement
      8. Internal pocket arrangement
      9. Superior mapping design
      10. Superior zip pullers
      11. Superior external fabric (specialised fabric sourced from Korea)
      12. Superior internal fabric
      13. Superior construction
      14. Trademark registered in various countries

  10. “SeV doesn’t mind competition, but AyeGear has not attempted to improve upon or seek inspiration from SeV’s products – they simply knocked them off” - given our dealings with Scott Jordan and his recent aggressive attitude towards a new KickStarter project by a new travel company (see point 3), it’s evident that Scott Jordan believes he invented pockets and travel garments.

  11. From the above points, and from an open letter written to Scott Jordan by one of his customers, it is clear that Scott Jordon operates his professional conduct poorly and unethically. Rather than making his products better, he chooses to instead invest money and time threatening his competitors, using their competitors trademarks in Google Ads in order to confuse consumers in the marketplace and registering trademarks that of his competitors in foreign countries in an attempt to stop them from competing in the marketplace (as seen above).